Aaron's Rent-To-Own Settles Computer Spying Charges

Aaron's Rent-To-Own
Image: Pixabay
October 24, 2013

Aaron's, Inc., a national rent-to-own retailer, has agreed to settle Federal Trade Commission (FTC) charges that it knowingly played a direct and vital role in its franchisees' installation and use of software on rental computers that secretly monitored consumers including by taking webcam pictures of them in their homes.

According to the FTC's complaint, Aaron's franchisees used the software, which surreptitiously tracked consumers' locations, captured images through the computers' webcams – including those of adults engaged in intimate activities – and activated keyloggers that captured users' login credentials for email accounts and financial and social media sites.

"Consumers have a right to rent computers free of cyberspying and to know when and how they are being tracked by a company," said Jessica Rich, director of the FTC's Bureau of Consumer Protection. "By enabling their franchisees to use this invasive software, Aaron's facilitated a violation of many consumers' privacy."

The complaint alleges that Aaron's knew about the privacy-invasive features of the software, but nonetheless allowed its franchisees to access and use the software, known as PC Rental Agent. In addition, Aaron's stored data collected by the software for its franchisees and also transmitted messages from the software to its franchisees. In addition, Aaron's provided franchisees with instructions on how to install and use the software.

The software was the subject of related FTC actions earlier this year against the software manufacturer and several rent-to-own stores, including Aaron's franchisees, that used it. It included a feature called Detective Mode, which, in addition to monitoring keystrokes, capturing screenshots, and activating the computer's webcam, also presented deceptive "software registration" screens designed to get computer users to provide personal information.

Under the terms of the proposed consent agreement with the FTC, Aaron's will be prohibited from using monitoring technology that captures keystrokes or screenshots, or activates the camera or microphone on a consumer's computer, except to provide technical support requested by the consumer.

In addition, Aaron's will be required to give clear notice and obtain express consent from consumers at the time of rental in order to install technology that allows location tracking of a rented product. The agreement will also prevent Aaron's from using any information it obtained through improper means in connection with the collection of any debt, money or property as part of a rent-to-own transaction. The company must delete or destroy any information it has improperly collected and transmit in an encrypted format any location or tracking data it collects properly.

Under the agreement, Aaron's will also be required to conduct annual monitoring and oversight of its franchisees and hold them to the requirements in the agreement that apply to Aaron's and its corporate stores, and to terminate the franchise agreements of franchises that do not meet those requirements.

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