Baby Jogger Recalls Car Seat Adaptors for Strollers Due to Fall Hazard

Baby Jogger Single Stroller Car Seat Adapter
Image: Pixabay
August 29, 2013

Baby Jogger is recalling more than 30,000 car seat adaptors for strollers. The car seat adaptor support bars can fail, posing a fall hazard to children.

The recalled car seat adaptors come in three models and are used to secure a variety of infant car seats onto Baby Jogger strollers. The 'Single' model fits all single strollers, the 'Double' works only on double strollers and the 'Select/Versa' fits Select and Versa strollers.

The car seat adaptors affected by this recall consist of two U-shaped, black, aluminum support bars and two black plastic adaptors that allow the support bars to attach onto the stroller. Black nylon straps secure the car seat to the adaptor on the stroller. The black support bars are labeled A and B. The A support bar is the larger of the two U-shaped bars and has a red plastic tip with 10 holes.

Newer models have only four holes and are not being recalled. The model number is located on the lower right hand corner of the original package and the manufacturing date can be found on a sticker on the bottom of the package. The affected model numbers are: BJ90121, BJ90221, and BJ90321.

The recalled car seat adaptors were sold at Buy Buy Baby and other juvenile product stores nationwide and at Albeebaby.com, Amazon.com, Buybuybaby.com, Diapers.com and other online retailers from June 2012 through June 2013.

Consumers should immediately stop using their car seat adaptor and contact Baby Jogger for free replacement support bars.

For more information on this recall, call Baby Jogger toll-free at 877-506-2213.

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