Batteries Sold With Columbia Sportswear Jackets Recalled; May Catch Fire

Columbia Sportswear recalls of Omni-Heat lithium batteries sold with jackets
Image: NCCC

Columbia Sportswear is re-announcing a recall of Omni-Heat lithium-polymer rechargeable batteries sold with a number of its jackets. The batteries have a cell defect which can cause overheating, posing a fire hazard.

This recall involves battery packs that power heating systems in jackets. The black battery packs are 3.25 inches long by 2.3 inches wide by 0.7 inches deep and marked with 'Columbia' on the top and 'OMNI-HEAT' on the bottom of the pack. Part number 054978-001 is printed on the side of the battery label.

Two battery packs were included with styles from:

  • Fall 2011 Mens: Electro Amp Jacket (SM7864) and Circuit Breaker Softshell (SM7855)
  • Fall 2011 Womens: Circuit Breaker Softshell (SL7856); Snow Hottie Jacket (SL7866), and Snow Hottie Parka (SL7853).

The recalled battery packs were sold with Columbia electric jackets sold by Columbia online and at Columbia Sportswear stores.

Consumers should immediately check the battery packs included with the electric jacket to determine if they are part of the recall. Those with affected batteries should immediately remove the affected battery pack(s) from the jacket and contact Columbia Sportswear for a free replacement.

For additional information, call Columbia Sportswear toll-free at 800-622-6953.

Get Connected with Consumer Connections

Stay up-to-date about issues that really matter! Get the Consumer Connections newsletter!

We're committed to providing you with information you need to make you a better, more informed consumer. Whether it's a vehicle recall, a product recall, or a new scam, we feature it in Consumer Connections.

So why not give it a try? Go on. All of your friends are doing it. It's completely free and comes just once a week.

While it can be part of a balanced and nutritious diet, grapefruit can have serious consequences when taken with certain medications. Currently, there are more than fifty prescription and over-the-counter drugs known to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that can have negative interactions with this fruit.

U.S. nonprescription, over-the-counter (OTC) medicines are among the most safely packaged consumer products in the world. Most of these OTC products, by law, are sealed in tamper-evident packaging for your protection. Unfortunately there is no such thing as a 100-percent tamper-proof package.

Since fresh produce is often grown in uncontrolled environments, there is always a chance of contamination. Fruits and vegetables can come into contact with harmful bacteria in soil or water, or it could become tainted during the harvesting or storage process. Ingesting contaminated produce can lead to many foodborne illnesses. Follow these recommendations to ensure you're protecting yourself and your family.

You see a doctor in the belief that he or she is in your insurer's network, only to find out afterward that the doctor was out-of-network when you get a huge bill. Don't give up! As frustrating as insurance can be, it's a necessary evil, and there are steps you can take to make sure that you spend as little as possible even when your doctor is out-of-network.