Communities Across the U.S. Seek $9.3 Billion in TIGER Grant Funding for Transportation

The 2016 TIGER grant program focuses on capital projects that generate economic development and improve access to reliable, safe and affordable transportation for communities

Communities Across the U.S. Seek $9.3 Billion in TIGER Grant Funding for Transportation
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June 15, 2016

The U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) says that the Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) grant program has received a whopping 585 applications from across the country totaling $9.3 billion in requested funding—which is 18 times greater than the $500 million in funding that will be awarded.

Now in its eighth year, the TIGER program has continued to attract overwhelming demand from communities of all sizes, with 337 applications coming from urban areas and 248 from rural communities. USDOT says that the high level of interest underscores the continued need for transportation investment nationwide.

"Communities across the country know that if we want a strong, multimodal transportation system that will meet our needs in the future, we need to make meaningful investments today," said U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx. "As we have seen year after year, there are far more worthy projects than we can fund through TIGER, demonstrating the need for a serious, long-term investment in transportation funding."

USDOT says that, like the first seven rounds, the 2016 TIGER grants will fund capital investments in surface transportation infrastructure and will be awarded on a competitive basis for projects that will have a significant impact on the nation, a metropolitan area, or a region.

The 2016 TIGER grant program focuses on capital projects that generate economic development and improve access to reliable, safe and affordable transportation for communities, both urban and rural. As in previous rounds, the TIGER program supports projects that promote safety, economic competitiveness, quality of life, environmental sustainability and state of good repair. The program also prioritizes innovation, partnership and ladders of opportunity, says USDOT.

Since 2009, the highly competitive TIGER program has provided nearly $4.6 billion in funding to 381 projects in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico, including 134 projects to support rural and tribal communities. Overall, USDOT says that it has received more than 6,700 applications requesting more than $134 billion in grant funding for transportation projects across the country.

TIGER funding was provided in the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2016, signed by President Obama on December 18, 2015.

More information about previous years' TIGER grantees as well as this year's application process can be found here.