CPSC Approves New Stroller and Baby Carriage Safety Standard

CPSC Approves New Stroller and Baby Carriage Safety Standard
Image: Pixabay
March 05, 2014

Good news, parents! The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) has approved a new federal safety standard that will improve the safety of all strollers and baby carriages sold after September 2015.

From January 2008 through June 2013, CPSC staff received about 1,300 safety-related reports for children 4 years old and younger that involved strollers. The numbers, which may change in the future as more reports come into the agency, include:

  • Four deaths
  • 14 hospitalizations
  • Nearly 391 injuries
The new safety standard requires that all strollers and carriages be made, tested and labeled to minimize the hazards seen in the above incidents. These include:

  • Hinge issues that have resulted in pinched, cut, or amputated fingers or arms. These issues have the highest injury rate of all hazards associated with strollers;
  • Broken and detached wheels;
  • Parking brake failures;
  • Locking mechanism problems;
  • Restraint issues, including children being able to unbuckle themselves and broken breaks and loose stroller seatbelts;
  • Structural integrity; and
  • Stability

Once the new rule takes effect, nearly all strollers sold are required to meet the new requirements. Remember, buckle your child up every time you use the stroller and never leave a child unattended in a stroller. After all, falls are the cause of many injuries associated with strollers.

As Acting CPSC Chairman Bob Adler recently said, "I believe it is time that we put a strong mandatory standard in place: A federal standard that helps to ensure that a stroller ride is a safe ride for babies and an equally safe ride for toddlers."

Get Connected with Consumer Connections

Stay up-to-date about issues that really matter! Get the Consumer Connections newsletter!

We're committed to providing you with information you need to make you a better, more informed consumer. Whether it's a vehicle recall, a product recall, or a new scam, we feature it in Consumer Connections.

So why not give it a try? Go on. All of your friends are doing it. It's completely free and comes just once a week.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is warning the public to keep these products—which contain the active ingredients tetrahydrozoline, oxymetazoline, or naphazoline (known as imidazoline derivatives)—out of the reach of children at all times. The products are sold under various brand names such as Visine, Dristan and Mucinex, as well as in generic and store brands.

For school children across the state of North Carolina and beyond, lunch at school can present itself as a time to eat pizza, cookies, chips, french fries, and other unhealthy options that may not typically be on the menu at home. To help combat the less-than-healthy choices that kids make on their own, many parents choose to pack lunches at home.

Have you ever left or thought about leaving the kids in the car while you make a 'quick stop' at the supermarket, dry cleaner or post office? It only takes a second for your car to shift into gear and rollaway, leaving your kids in tremendous danger.

It'll only be a minute, you say. You crack the windows and lock the car leaving your sleeping infant cozy in her car seat. The problem is that it's never just a minute. It's always longer than that and it only takes 10 minutes for your car to heat up to dangerous temperatures—potentially killing or permanently injuring your child.