Former Audi Manager Charged in Connection With Conspiracy to Cheat U.S. Emissions Tests

From 2006 to 2015, Pamio led a team of engineers responsible for designing emissions control systems to meet emissions standards

Former Audi Manager Charged in Connection With Conspiracy to Cheat U.S. Emissions Tests
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July 11, 2017

A former Audi manager has been charged for his role in the long-running conspiracy to defraud U.S. regulators and customers by implementing software specifically designed to cheat U.S. emissions tests in thousands of Audi "clean diesel" vehicles, the U.S. Department of Justice (USDOJ) announced.

Giovanni Pamio, an Italian citizen, is the former head of Thermodynamics within Audi's Diesel Engine Development Department in Neckarsulm, Germany. He is charged with conspiring to defraud the U.S., wire fraud, and violating of the Clean Air Act.

The Complaint

According to the USDOJ complaint, from in or about 2006 until in or about November 2015, Pamio led a team of engineers responsible for designing emissions control systems to meet emissions standards—including for nitrogen oxides ("NOx")—for diesel vehicles in the U.S.

The complaint states that after Pamio and his coconspirators realized that it was impossible to calibrate a diesel engine that would meet NOx emissions standards within the design constraints imposed by other departments at the company, he directed Audi employees to design and implement software functions to cheat the standard U.S. emissions tests.

Knowingly Misrepresented Vehicle Compliance

USDOJ says that Pamio and his coconspirators deliberately failed to disclose the software functions, and knowingly misrepresented that the vehicles complied with U.S. NOx emissions standards.

Audi's parent company, Volkswagen AG (VW), previously pleaded guilty to three felony counts connected to cheating U.S. emissions standards. The company was ordered to pay a $2.8 billion criminal fine at its sentencing on April 21, 2017.

The complaint against Pamio is merely an allegation. He is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt in a court of law.