Purina-Blue Buffalo Feud Heats Up: Blue Buffalo Blames Supplier for Ingredient Mix-Up

Purina-Blue Buffalo Feud Heats Up: Blue Buffalo Blames Supplier for Ingredient Mix-Up
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October 28, 2014

"While Nestle Purina is pretending like they're disclosing it voluntarily, they fought our efforts to make their testing public for months," wrote Bishop in a letter dated the same day.

Bishop claims that the analysis was, "in reality an individual with dubious scientific credentials who works out of a lab in his home. His analysis was performed with a rudimentary microscope under less than optimal conditions with questionable methods and record keeping."

Naturally, Purina responded to the recent announcement from Blue Buffalo.

"Remarkably, it was Purina – not Blue Buffalo – that unearthed the truth through its scientific testing and, more recently, from documents it obtained through the legal process from one of Blue Buffalo's ingredient suppliers," said a statement on the company's website.

Although Purina disputes Blue Buffalo's marketing of its products to be poultry-by-product-free, the company itself uses poultry by-product as an ingredient.

Suggested Resources

Lawsuits aside, finding a new pet food can be overwhelming: grain versus grain-free, chicken meal versus chicken by-product meal, raw versus cooked.

DogFoodAdvisor.com breaks down the ingredients on the back of the label while offering commentary on why they are good or bad for your dog. The website operators don't accept advertising or samples from pet food companies. Unfortunately, the website does not offer similar ratings for cats, but suggests that since dog and cat formulas are similar, the rating for the dog food is a good indicator of the quality of the cat food.